Amazon Forest Inventory Network

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Bolivia

  • June - October 2011
Bolivia

A total of 21 plots were measured between June and October 2011 in various locations in Bolivia with support from the Moore-foundation. This grant was awarded to RAINFOR to monitor the impact of the 2010 drought on Amazon forest dynamics. This fieldwork kicked off in June 2011 with the remeasurements of a set of 10 plots in the Parque Noel Kempff Mercado in the east of Bolivia with a team of 7 people, led by Alejandro Murakami and Alexander Germaine and local support from Chiqui Arroyo. These plots are all located in or near the National Park but contain different forest types and are on different soils. They include a set of four plots on the spectacular 500m high Huanchaca plateau, which imposes a real physical challenge to the team as it can only be accessed by climbing up by foot with all the equipment. After this trip, Alejandro Murakami travelled to the far north of Bolivia in august where he worked together with students from the Universidad Autonoma de Beni (UAB) to remeasure four hectare of Permanent Sample Plot in the Reserva El Tigre. Following this work, two plots (Sacta) located at the foothills of the Andes in the district of Cochabamba were measured at the beginning of September with the help of Casimiro Mendoza (FOMABO, Manejo Forestal en las Tierras Tropicales de Bolivia). Towards the end of the same month a further 7 plots were recensused in the north-eastern part of Pando, close to the border with Brazil. These plots were set-up between 1999 and 2003 and managed by the Universidad Autonoma de Beni (UAB) and IBIF, in collaboration with the logging company MABET. This work was jointly led by Alexander Germaine and Guido Pardo (UAB) and the team further consisted mainly of students of the UAB.  Roel Brienen travelled to the north of Bolivia to help this work getting started. He also spent some time in the region to collect some wood samples for a tree ring study on Cedrela and some other species. The aim of this study is to generate important insights into long-term growth and physiological responses of a selection of Amazon tree species to climate change and atmospheric CO2-concentrationsThese data on the dynamics of this set of Bolivian plots will give important insight into the responses of the tropical forest to the 2010 drought event, which occurred just 5 years after the 2005 drought.